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Sharif Tweets! [#2] “Takin’ a Bite Outta Apple”

After becoming more experienced with Apple and their products, I of course, began to discover that they were not a perfect company either.

Being a computer nerd since the age of 5, I originally was exclusive to Microsoft’s Windows. However when I reached young adulthood I decided to go with my uncle’s favourite and switch to Apple after I started working for his company. I generally found Apple to be better after having grown tired of all the bugginess, virus management, and cluttered interface of Windows at the time. This was back in the early to mid 00s when Apple changed its CPUs to Intel making it compatible with Adobe products for the first time, which was the major selling point for me at the time.

However after becoming more experienced with Apple and their products, I of course, began to discover that they were not a perfect company either. What many Apple owners have noticed, which has only gotten worse, is their strict policy to push propriety or exclusive technologies on their products. The other of course is the price. I have noticed that the more popular and successful the company has become, the lower the quality and usefulness of their products. I think this has to do with two reasons, their major success being based on novelty products (different coloured iPods! YAY!) pushing them in that direction as well as the death of Steve Jobs who held a painfully high level standard of quality.

The following is the second in my “Sharif Tweets!” series where I compile a selection of my tweets on a particular subject:

My early career was highly revolving around flash development for the web. When Apple announced that they would not support flash on their devices it started a trend that has other companies follow suit. I, as you may have guessed, was not pleased:

In retrospect I found out that Adobe did not make it easy for those companies to allow their micro-controller based devices work with Flash, so it was probably for the best.

One of the main draws to Apple from Microsoft were its beautiful aesthetic designs and standards, now washed out in imitation of Google.

However when Apple introduced iOS7 with its new “flat” design along with Yosemite, I was not impressed. One of the main draws to Apple from Microsoft were its beautiful aesthetic designs and standards, now washed out in imitation of Google. On top of this issue, I never trust latest OS versions from any company as I want to be assured the bugs have first been sorted out. Moreover for mobile, iOS7 was rendering older devices useless once updating due to its demand for more powerful hardware.

  

They eventually, as expected, ended up going full blown unnecessary with their brand abuse path, releasing the Apple Watch, a device that seems really cool until you realize it costs about as much as your smart phone, yet requires your smart phone to use it!

Things really got bad with the release of the iPhone 7 when even the mainstream public or those who may not have as deep or close a relationship with Apple’s products finding out that Apple’s “improvement” could be quite counterintuitive and not worth the asking price:

Nowadays I use both Mac and Windows, as I see strength in both, oftentimes running a virtual machine of one inside the other. I do admit that although I originally thought it was a useless device, the iPad can be a very productive tool, something I found out after buying my wife an iPad, accidentally breaking it, buying a new one and fixing the old one for myself. Neither was a smart phone user until a few years ago when I got an iPhone 5 as a hand-me-down, as you can guess I leverage its power and convenience daily.

Also my main desktop computer is a very powerful iMac from 2013 on the cusp of their transition from Jobs to the new CEO. This means it runs Mavericks which still has that classic Apple charm that got me into them in the first place. However it’s not perfect, having issues older Apple products wouldn’t have had like mechanical issues with the screen’s pivot function and hardware limitations due to its “less is more” design in terms of controller defaults.

Though someone offered the solution of a powered USB hub, thanks to modern technology advancements, I happily run VMware on my desktop when I need to with nearly native performance.

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